How To Make The Extraordinary, Ordinary

Written by Sean McPheat | Linkedin thumb

To be a top sales person requires the ability to go above and beyond the norm every single day. As a professional sales person, your job is to do things that are quite remarkable on a routine basis.

IncredibleExtraordinary
Think about what it means to make a sale from a cold call: You contact someone who has never heard of you and instantly develop a rapport. You then unearth and expose problems the person is having, which in many cases; they did not even know they were having. You then present a solution to the problem in the form of a product or service, which often they never knew existed. Then finally, you motivate the person to give you money for that solution. While some sales processes are not quite as quick, still, just closing sales is amazing.

The Next Level
Then, to be a top sales person, you have to consistently surpass sales quotas and break sales records, which actually means that you have to make HISTORY routinely. So how do you get to the point to do what is extra ordinary on an ordinary basis?

Climb Mount Kilimanjaro, Run the Boston Marathon
For the ordinary person, to climb to the top of a mountain or run and complete a marathon, just once in a lifetime would be an extraordinary accomplishment. Yet for some, like a couple in the U.S. I spoke with recently, such things are quite ordinary. Jane and Eric, both near 50 years old, have run a dozen marathons. Eric competes in duathlons, which may consist of a 20km run, followed by an 80km bike race and finishing with a short 10km run, or something like that, and Jane has been to the literal mountaintop several times.

I asked this dynamic duo how they managed to make such extraordinary practices seem so basic, and their reply maps so clearly to what we need to do as professional sales people, I thought I would share these three short tips with you.

Making the Extraordinary, Ordinary

#1: Train, Prepare, Get in Shape
While this tip may appear obvious, it seems many sales people do not take this seriously. While you must practice relentlessly and educate yourself continually, you also have to be in good physical condition.

Vince Lombardi once said, “Fatigue makes cowards of us all.” When your physical energy is lacking from little sleep or poor diet and such, it adversely affects your ability to withstand rejection, overcome objections and ask for the order with strength.

#2: Get Your Head Right
In addition to good psychical conditioning, you have to be mentally prepared. You need to focus on possible, positive thought and have an optimistic view of everything, even when everything seems to be going wrong.

Jane and Eric said they closely watch their physical AND mental diets. You have to be careful of what goes into your mind as well as into your body. You have to limit your intake of negativity, fear, pessimism and doubt. Try not to spend too much time with that colleague who does nothing but complain about how bad everything is all the time.

#3: Just Do It – ONCE
Finally, Eric and Jane say that you have to do whatever it takes to do that incredible thing—just one time. Sacrifice, push yourself, do what you have to do, but get it done just ONCE. Set that goal to break that sales record, be the top sales person of the month or reach that next level, and tell yourself that all you have to do is get it done ONE TIME. You can withstand almost anything for a short period of time.

Once you reach that goal, once you break that record, you will see that doing it again, is not quite as difficult. Then you will realize that reaching an even higher level is not that tough either.

All or None
As you can see, without #1 and #2, #3 becomes impossible. However, you do not have to climb a 20,000-foot rock or run a thousand miles every month to rise above the ordinary in sales. Just follow a few basic, not easy, but basic principles, and make a commitment to being an extraordinary salesperson.

Happy Selling!

Sean

MTD Sales Training | Sales Blog

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Originally published: 4 July, 2012