Selling To A Company Rife With Politics

Written by Sean McPheat | Linkedin thumb

Pound sign with graduation capIt’s Budget week here in the UK!

Don’t you just love it when politicians try to balance the books and make it look as if they’re doing us a favour! No matter what any of the parties say, the others always find a different view.

I’ll wait until the Telegraph comes out on Thursday to find out what it was REALLY about!

No matter which direction we turn, we rarely get away from politics and the ramifications of it all.

What about you?

Do you often suffer from customers who use company politics as an excuse to buy from some other company?

Selling to a company steeped in politics is more about listening than pitching.

You’ll hear the expression ‘we’ more than ‘I’. When the prospect says that ‘we’ will be looking at your proposal, then believe it!

Your client may be looking at the big picture, and prioritising between department schedules. Make sure the person you are talking to is actually the one making the decision!

So, what can you do?

• Start by being very clear on objections and who, exactly, is raising them.

• Keep the perspective of your products and services company-specific

• Make sure that people in your firm are connected with the people in your prospect’s firm. Ask if your engineers can talk to your prospect’s engineers.

• Ascertain how much power the person you are dealing with actually has within their firm

• If you already have a contact within the company, get them to help you by acting as an advocate for you

• Show how buying your products and services equal no risks to them or their company

• Close your customer with a written proposal that includes enough information that whoever reads through it has everything they need to make an intelligent decision

Alistair Darling’s Budget might not be to everyone’s taste this week, but at least you’ll have the right mindset to approach your customers when they get political!

Happy selling!

Sean

Sean McPheat
Managing Director

MTD Sales Training | Sales Blog

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Originally published: 22 March, 2010