Overcoming The Fear Of Failing In Sales

Written by Sean McPheat | Linkedin thumb

30 April, 2013

Success and Failure road signThe sale is the most important aspect of any business. No matter what you make, no matter what service you deliver or what you do – unless you persuade enough people to pay you for doing it you don’t have a business.  Go on; try to think of a business, company or organisation that doesn’t need to persuade people to do enough “business” with them in order to survive! We may not always be talking about money transactions either; you might sell ideas within an organisation. It’s still a sale!

Selling is the most important thing to a business, it pays for everything. You want a better car? Where does the money come from? You want more resources? Where does the money come from? Even government organisations now create business cases, which is selling.

Is it any wonder therefore, given the importance, that we care enough to worry about failing? Yes, you read it correctly. In order to worry about failing you must care. If you care enough about anything you’ll find a way to succeed.

It was once suggested to me that the word FAIL actually means First Action In Learning. Thomas Edison ‘failed’ thousands of times, for instance.

I believe the mistake that most salespeople make is to expect that everybody wants to see them and once they’ve seen the product or experienced the serviced they will definitely buy. Now – don’t get me wrong – there’s nothing wrong with a positive and assertive approach. It’s just that no salesperson has a 100% sale-rate and there is no salesperson that hasn’t occasionally had to hear the word ‘No!’ despite their best efforts.

Depending on your industry and the level of competitors and how their offer compares to yours, you should have a good idea what percentage of people you have to speak to get a sale.

Let’s say its 100 calls to make 10 sales, that’s 1 in 10 or 10%. So for every 9 people who say no, you should be nine steps closer to a ‘Yes!’

You could say therefore that one ‘No’ is a tenth of a ‘Yes’. Change the figures to suit your market and have some fun with this idea. The more fun you have, the more relaxed you’ll be. The more you relax and experience the learning, the more you’ll sell.

Happy Selling!

Sean McPheat
Managing Director

MTD Sales Training | Sales Blog | Image courtesy of Stuart Miles at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

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